Harmless, Harmful: A Review of Othello

They had me cornered–two adults sitting on the ground, and my friend in between them. I gave them all a bewildered look and sat heavily on the ribbed metal bench. The man asked the dreaded question. “So, where are you from?” I wanted to run away screaming, certain I would be here for hours. “Well,”…

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Top Three Books: June 2019

We’ve been all over this month, visiting New York, Paris, and more–including libraries and bookshops. Here are this month’s best finds: The House of Windjammer, by V. A. Richardson The heart of the house of Windjammer is in their ships. When their magnificent Star Fleet is lost on a long and fruitless journey to the Americas,…

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#WisdomForFuture: A Review of A Civil Action

On Friday the fifteenth of March, Greta Thunberg proclaimed another #FridaysForFuture—a day when students skipped school to protest for responsible energy usage and a cleaner, greener planet. I watched videos of thousands of students out on the streets, holding up signs and shouting things like “You’re killing our lungs!” The same day, I accompanied a…

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Vines and Threads: A Review of Leviathan

We sped past the pine trees, leaving only exhaust in our wake. The wooded area by the highway was lush and green, but I recognized a plant that should not have been there. The kudzu vine is invasive in my area; you see it everywhere. How could we contain it? I frowned, gazing at a…

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Late-Night Education: A Review of Little Soldiers

I sat in the back of the classroom, sketching the enormous vase of flowers in front of me. A girl walked in and looked over my shoulder. She was maybe eight years old, and Asian—probably Chinese, since they taught Mandarin as well as art here. After a few minutes of conversation, the girl announced, “I…

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Top Three Books: March 2019

With the trees budding outside and the flowers in our yard beginning to bloom, this month has been a time of new beginnings—both for nature and for my bookshelf. Here are some of March’s most fascinating books: Goose Girl, by Shannon Hale Anidori-Kiladri Talianna Isilee, or, for the ease of anyone wishes to speak her…

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